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Gold Medal

2018 Recipients - Trans Canada Trail, Perry Bellegarde, Clément Chartier, Natan Obed, Ry Moran and Roberta Jamieson

Education has always been a cornerstone of the Society’s foundation. This year’s roster of Gold Medal recipients includes the leaders of the five Indigenous organizations that partnered with The Royal Canadian Geographical Society to create Canada’s highly successful Indigenous Peoples Atlas of Canada and its accompanying educational tools. The Atlas content has been produced in partnership with the Assembly of First Nations, the Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, the Métis National Council, the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation, and Indspire. These partners represent an unparalleled breadth and depth of knowledge, as well as the strong ties among their respective communities and networks.

National Chief Perry Bellegarde

Perry Bellegarde, National Chief of the Assembly of First Nations (AFN)

National Chief Bellegarde is a strong advocate for honouring and implementing inherent rights and Treaty rights, title and jurisdiction. Drawing on the strong beliefs and traditions instilled in him by the many Chiefs and Elders he has known, National Chief Bellegarde is passionate about creating real, measurable progress on priorities that matter most to First Nations and that will close the gap in the quality of life between First Nations and the rest of Canada. National Chief Bellegarde considers the Indigenous Peoples Atlas of Canada an important educational resource that will help increase understanding of First Nations peoples, cultures, contributions and perspectives in school curricula nationwide and contribute to the overall effort toward reconciliation.

Clément Chartier, President of Métis National Council (MNC)

President Chartier at the Supreme Court of Canda when the Manitoba Metis Federation won their landclaim case in 2013. Photo: Ke Ning/ Métis National Council

Clément Chartier is a lawyer, writer, activist, lecturer, and leader who has served in both political and administrative capacities with Indigenous Peoples’ organizations in Canada and abroad. He has advanced the Métis Nation’s rights agenda within the judicial system and is focused on the adoption of a new modern Métis Nation constitution. As president, he placed the full support of the MNC behind the Indigenous Peoples Atlas of Canada, a ground-breaking educational resource that will amplify the content and perspectives of the Métis in school curricula across Canada.

Natan Obed, President of Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami (ITK)

Natan Obed

Natan Obed has devoted his career to working with Inuit representational organizations to improve the well-being of Inuit in Canada. He has been instrumental in working towards a renewed relationship with the Government of Canada based on mutual respect. Obed placed the full support of ITK behind the Indigenous Peoples Atlas of Canada, a ground-breaking educational resource that will strengthen Inuit content and perspectives in school curricula nationwide.

Ry Moran, Director of the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation (NCTR)

Ry Moran

As the founding director of the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation, Ry Moran has worked tirelessly to build a vibrant, dynamic and effective organization that generates awareness and understanding among all Canadians about Indigenous issues, past, present and future. He offered his full support to the Indigenous Peoples Atlas of Canada, a ground-breaking educational resource that will amplify Indigenous content and perspectives in school curricula nationwide.

Roberta Jamieson, President and CEO of Indspire

Roberta Jamieson

Roberta Jamieson is an inspirational leader who has garnered national acclaim and recognition for her role in shaping public policy and good governance in Canada and for her successful efforts to advance the educational outcomes of Indigenous students nationwide. As president and CEO, she offered the full support of Indspire to the Indigenous Peoples Atlas of Canada, a ground-breaking educational resource that will deepen Indigenous content and perspectives in school curricula across the country.

Gold Medal organizational recipient: The Trans Canada Trail

The Great Trail has been called the contemporary equivalent of the national dream, connecting millions of Canadians and exposing them to their natural heritage and remarkable geography, to new people and communities.

The Society is awarding the Gold Medal to The Trans Canada Trail (TCT) for connecting all the different sections of the trail into The Great Trail, an ambitious and inclusionary national project that connects Canadians from coast to coast to coast. The world’s longest network of multi-use recreational trails, The Great Trail is a stunning achievement of vision, ingenuity, and hard work. And it is a testament to the spirit and pride of committed leaders, dedicated volunteers and advocates, generous donors, strategic partners, as well as public and private sector supporters.

Launched in 1992 as a legacy project of Canada’s 125th anniversary by Bill Pratt and Pierre Camu, it was fully connected in 2017, a momentous accomplishment that coincided with Canada’s 150th anniversary.

The Great Trail necessitates a redrawing of the map of Canada to depict this route of exploration and discovery for all. This new map of Canada shows a clear path for those who seek recreation, education, and inspiration in the country’s incomparable physical and human geography.



« 2016 Gold Medal Recipients
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